Northern Lights Panorama

Jökulsárlón Aurora

Northern Lights Photography

Northern lights add an extra dimension to night photography because they add strong colours and depth to the sky. Sometimes they can be so bright that you could argue it is no longer night photography because exposures can be so short. Modern DSLRs can see the Northern lights with the live view better than the eye. With such fantastic high iso performance, you can photograph bright auroras in just a few seconds, which means you are catching 100s of photographs in a night.

Volcanic Glow

We were at the Jökulsárlón Glacier lagoon during our Winter workshop. These Auroras were nothing special, they were mostly green and appeared to be blurred. The orange glow to the right is from the Holuhraun volcanic eruption which was going on about 100 miles North of us. There is a possibility that there is a huge screen of ash making the Northern lights seem blurred. My 24mm was broken, so I was stuck with my 50mm prime. This is not an ideal focal length for Aurora photography, but it is a perfect focal length for panoramas.

Adobe Lightroom Panorama

As thi was a planned panorama, each frame has exactly the same exposure and focus. I can simply adjust
picture and copy the settings to the other photo by sync. or by copying previous settings. First, I increased exposure and clarity for the foreground.

Lightroom exposure and clarity

Lightroom : Increased exposure and clarity for the foreground.

Next I increased white and de-haze for the sky.

Lightroom : Increased white and de-haze

Lightroom : Increased white and de-haze for the sky.

I simply copied the settings to the other photograph and merged them into a panorama.

Lightroom Panorama

Lightroom: selected both frames and select Merge > Panorama

Read more about photographing the Northern Lights.

Or come and do it for real in Iceland…

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